Simple, Healthy, and Tasty Sauteed Garlicky Swiss Chard

Sauteed Garlicky Chard Recipe by Cook Smarts

I consider myself a fairly healthy person, but I would never eat something just because it was healthy. It also has to taste good. Apparently, I’m just too much of a hedonist to sacrifice taste for health. I think there are a lot of people like me but they also hold the notion that healthy cannot taste good. If this were true, I’d be constantly starving or extremely overweight by now.

This garlicky sauteed swiss chard recipe is a simple vegetable dish that helps buck the notion that healthy can’t be tasty. It also shows that less can be more, that just a few simple ingredients is all it takes to create a dish that nourishes you physically while also exciting your taste buds.

Chard, whether red, green, or rainbow and unlike a lot of other greens, lacks bitterness. Instead, you will find a subtle sweetness that welcomes any additional flavor you put on it. Feel free to get creative or use this tried and true combination – garlic, parmesan cheese, plus a squeeze of lemony brightness – and you’ll forget you’re actually eating something healthy.

5.0 from 1 reviews

Sauteed Garlicky Swiss Chard
 
This garlicky sauteed swiss chard recipe is a simple vegetable dish that helps buck the notion that healthy can’t be tasty. It also shows that less can be more, that just a few simple ingredients is all it takes to create a dish that nourishes you physically while also exciting your taste buds.
Author:
Recipe type: Vegetable Side Dish
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • Chard – 1 bunch
  • Garlic cloves, minced – 4
  • Canola / grapeseed oil – 2 tbs.
  • Lemons, juice – ½
  • Parmesan cheese – 2 oz.
Prep (can be done earlier in the day)
  1. Chard – Tear leaves off of stems. Wash and dry. Wash stems and chop into ½” segments
  2. Garlic – Mince
Make
  1. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil and then minced garlic and chard stems with a dash of salt to heated oil. Sauté until soft, ~3 min
  2. Add chard leaves, as much as can fit in the pan at a time, with a pinch of kosher salt. Add more leaves as room is made in the pan. Sauté until all leaves are wilted. Season to taste with salt and pepper, add a squeeze of lemon, and grate cheese over warm chard
Smarts
  1. Some recipes recommend that you throw away chard stems or not separate them from the leaves. We think you should keep them because they provide a nice texture (and have a lot of fiber). However, separate them from the leaves because they take a bit longer to cook. To see our guide to prepping greens like chard and kale, check out this video.

 

 

Get free meal plans & cook delicious meals like this every night!

Get your three free meal plans from Cook Smarts
Try our meal planning service for free with no payment info required. Get out of your dinner rut and feel inspired in the kitchen!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Print Friendly

Comments

  1. says

    I never make swiss chard but see it in the stores. I have always wanted to try it and I think you just inspired me! :) Does this dish keep in the fridge if there are leftovers? Or do you typically eat it all at once?

    • says

      @Julia You can definitely keep the leftovers though I think kale heats up better than chard. It actually gets eaten up pretty fast because that large bunch cooks down significantly. Thanks for stopping by!

  2. markell says

    This looks SO GOOD!! I love chard, but never make it “italian” (with the flavors you use here). I have some fancy parmesan from a friend’s mom that I can use up in this recipe! Thanks Jess!!

  3. Jenn says

    Seriously, is there anything more satisfying than going at a wedge of parmesan with a microplane? The resulting snowy, whipser-light mound of salty-creamy goodness bestills my heart. Jess–Can you please explain what the deal is with grape seed oil? It’s pretty expensive, so when/why do you use it?

    • says

      @Jenn You should use grape seed oil for high heat cooking. I use canola / grapeseed for high heat and then keep a good olive oil around for when taste matters, like making vinaigrettes

Join the conversation