Being able to create meals from your pantry is, like any skill, something that will become easier with practice. Our guide will give you just the start you need to stock your pantry with the essentials, so you’ll never be far from a simple, healthy meal.


Your Pantry Essentials Guide

This pantry guide not only tells you what should be in a smartly-stocked pantry, but also gives you plenty of ideas on how to use those pantry essentials. We’ve also included gluten-free, paleo, and vegetarian versions of each section in this guide, so it can be a resource for almost everyone.

You can also download any (or all!) of the guides below for free, so that you can print it out, stick on your fridge or your wall, and reference at anytime!

Infographic

Pantry Essentials Guide

Keep your pantry stocked with these basics, so you'll never be far from a simple, healthy meal.

Infographic

Paleo Pantry Essentials Guide

Make paleo cooking simple and tasty with this special paleo guide to pantry essentials.

Infographic

Vegetarian Pantry Essentials Guide

This vegetarian pantry essentials guide shows all the basics you need to keep vegetarian cooking quick, simple, and delicious.

Infographic

Gluten-Free Pantry Essentials Guide

This special gluten-free guide includes the basics needed to make gluten-free cooking easy and just as satisfying.


Grains

Grains can add texture, bulk, and comfort to any dish. There is such a wide variety of grains with different health benefits, it’s good to stock a mix of whole-grains and quicker-cooking grains.

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • Whole grains – farro, barley, brown rice, steel cut oats
  • Quicker-cooking grains – white rice, quinoa, rolled oats, couscous

DIET SPECIFIC:

  • Gluten-free – While many  grains are gluten-free, some like barley, couscous, and farro are not. Be sure to look it up if you’re not sure!
  • Paleo – Since grains are not part of the paleo diet, stock cauliflower, which can be pulsed and turned into cauliflower rice (see our how-to video below).

IDEAS FOR USES:

  • Grains + veggies + vinaigrette = grain bowl
  • Grains + stock + veggies = simple soup
  • Grains + veggies + tortilla = veggie burrito

TIPS:

  • Cooked grains freeze well, so make a larger batch to freeze for easy reheating next time.
  • Cauliflower rice is not just for paleo folks! It also freezes well, so make a larger batch to freeze for a future meal. If you don’t have the time to make it from scratch, some grocery stores now sell cauliflower rice.
Video

How to Make Cauliflower Rice

Cauliflower rice is a great low-carb, low-cal alternative to normal rice, and very easy to make.


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Pastas

When you have nothing else planned, pasta is the most reliable back meal. (Plus it’s comforting and quick!)

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • Stock all your favorite Italian pastas but try other ethnic varieties, like Asian rice noodles, buckwheat soba noodles, Israeli couscous, and orzo.

DIET SPECIFIC:

  • Gluten-free – Stores now stock so many gluten-free pastas made of rice, quinoa, and even beans. Experiment until you find your favorite type and brand. When buying Asian rice noodles and buckwheat soba noodles, which are usually gluten-free, check the packaging to make sure they are for sure.
  • Paleo – Since pastas are not part of the paleo diet, purchase a spiralizer and turn your favorite veggies (like sweet potatoes and zucchini) into veggie noodles (see our how-to video below).

IDEAS FOR USES:

  • Pasta + crushed tomatoes + dried herbs + ground meat = pasta with meat sauce
  • Rice noodles + stock + frozen veggies = noodle soup

TIPS:

Video

How to Make Vegetable Noodles with a Spiralizer

A spiralizer is a great tool to help you make vegetable noodles, which make a great paleo, gluten-free, or low-carb alternative to traditional pasta.


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Nuts

Nuts are full of good fats and make filling snacks, but they’re also a great supplement to meals like salads, sauteed veggies, and grain bowls.

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • Keep your favorites on hand, such as almonds, cashews, peanuts (technically a legume), pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts.
  • Stock your favorite nut butters as well.

DIET SPECIFIC:

  • Paleo – Avoid peanuts or anything with peanuts, because it’s technically a legume.

ideas for uses:

  • Nuts + herbs + garlic + olive oil = delicious pesto
  • Crushed nuts (like almonds) + protein (like fish) = crunchy breaded protein
  • Nuts + dried fruit = healthy trail mix
  • Nut butter + almond milk + avocado = smoothie
  • Nut butter + soy sauce (or Tamari if gluten-free, or aminos if paleo) + rice vinegar + water = nut dressing

TIPS:

  • Purchase your favorites in the bulk aisle for extra savings.
  • Store varieties you don’t go through very quickly in the fridge or freezer.
  • Branch out from the typical peanut butter and try something that works for everyone, such as almond butter, which is gluten-free and paleo.

Thanks to our friends at Thrive Market, you can enjoy a free jar of almond butter (just pay $1.95 for shipping) when you sign up for a membership to Thrive here*! You can cancel your membership within the 30 day trial period and you won’t be charged the annual fee of $59.95. If you become a member, you can shop from their great collection of products, which includes lots of gluten-free and paleo pantry essentials, all year long.


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Legumes

Dried or canned, legumes are a healthy, versatile and inexpensive vegetarian protein to have around.

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • Stock all your favorites – black, black-eyed peas, cannellini, garbanzo, kidney, lentils, split peas, pinto

DIET SPECIFIC:

  • Paleo – Avoid this whole section, since legumes are not paleo-friendly!

IDEAS FOR USES:

  • Legumes + soups / enchiladas / burritos / tacos / salads = easy vegetarian meal
  • Chickpeas + tahini + lemon + garlic + olive oil = basic hummus
  • Rice + black or kidney beans = classic budget-friendly meal
  • White beans + veggies + stock = pureed soup with extra protein

TIPS:

  • Save even more money by purchasing dried beans. To cook dried beans, put them in a slow cooker with 3x the water, and a few bay leaves for 3 hours on high.
  • Legumes are a great source of vegetarian protein (even if you’re not vegetarian). Learn more with our Guide to Vegetarian Protein Sources:
Infographic

Guide to Vegetarian Protein Sources

Get your daily requirement of protein with a variety of vegetarian protein sources, which usually contain more fiber and cost less than animal protein sources.


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Seeds

Seeds can add healthy fat, protein, fiber and texture to a variety of meals.

what to stock:

  • Crunchy seeds like sesame, sunflower, and pumpkin seeds (aka pepitas) for adding to salads, soups, or even tacos.
  • Finer seeds like hemp, flax, or chia for smoothies, baked goods, granola, or oatmeal.
  • Don’t forget seed butters, like sunflower seed butter and tahini (made from ground sesame seeds).

ideas for uses:

  • Crunchy seeds + nuts + dried fruit = trail mix
  • Crunchy seeds + salad greens + protein = balanced salad
  • Finer seeds + fruit + yogurt (or coconut milk if paleo) + ice = smoothie
  • Finer seeds + steel cut oats + dried fruit + nuts = healthy morning oatmeal
  • Finer seeds + crushed nuts + protein = paleo and gluten-free crunchy baked protein

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Flours, Breading & Thickeners

Flours and breading ensure that baked goods and crunchy breaded goodies can always be readily made.

what to stock:

  • Flours – all-purpose flour and any other varieties you enjoy baking with, like buckwheat and whole-wheat
  • Breading – panko and breadcrumbs can be used to bread a variety of veggies and proteins
  • Thickeners – cornstarch, arrowroot powder

diet specific:

  • Gluten-free – Stores now stock so many gluten-free flours made primarily of beans, nuts, and vegetable starches. Experiment until you find your favorite type, brand, and / or mix. For breading, look for gluten-free panko or breadcrumbs or make your own from gluten-free bread.
  • Paleo – Since wheat-based flours are not paleo, look for almond and coconut flours. They are not exact substitutes for wheat-based flours, so do follow paleo-specific recipes. For breading, use crushed nuts or nut flours. For thickeners, avoid cornstarch and stick with arrowroot powder.

ideas for uses:

  • Breading + fish = crunchy baked fish
  • Flours + egg + milk + baking essentials = muffins or pancakes
  • Soy sauce (or Tamari if gluten-free, or aminos if paleo) + water + cornstarch (or arrowroot powder) = stir-fry sauce

tips:

  • For flours you won’t use very frequently, purchase in bulk so you can control the amount you purchase.
  • Store flours in a cool, dry place. Whole wheat and nut flours are best stored in the fridge or freezer for longer shelf-life.

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Canned Fish

Canned fish are inexpensive, already cooked, and usually full of healthy fats. They’re the perfect option for a quick, tasty meal when you don’t have time to run to the grocery store.

what to stock:

  • Sardines, tuna (buy canned light vs. white due to mercury levels), and salmon

diet specific:

  • Vegetarian – Since fish is not vegetarian, keep some canned beans around instead for an easy and filling meal.

ideas for uses:

  • Sardines + tomato sauce + toast = peasant Italian dinner
  • Tuna / salmon + mayo + celery = fish salad

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Sauces & Soup Bases

Canned tomatoes, coconut milk, broths, stocks, and bouillons transform into bases for many meals. They can be the foundation for sauces, braises, and soups.

WHAT TO STOCK:

IDEAS FOR USES:

  • Stock + beans + diced tomatoes + veggies + spices = veggie chili
  • Crushed tomatoes + aromatics (like garlic and shallots) = homemade tomato sauce
  • Stock + rice + tomatoes = flavored rice
  • Coconut milk + fish sauce + curry paste + stock = curry soup base

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Oils

Oils are often our most used pantry essential, with many recipes starting with heating oil, which is the start of many cooking techniques. Keep one high smoke-point oil as your all-purpose oil, so you can use it for both cooking and raw applications.

What to stock:

  • Use an oil with a high smoke-point, like avocado oil or pure olive oil, as your all-purpose oil. It’ll be versatile enough to suit any type of cooking need.
  • Keep an extra-virgin olive oil for dipping and for drizzling over finished dishes.

diet specific:

  • Paleo – Avoid peanut oil and refined oils.

tips:

  • Store oils in a cold, dark place. Nut oils should be stored in the fridge so they don’t go rancid.
  • To learn more about oils, check out our Guide to Oils and get the full infographic here:
Infographic

Guide to Oils

Become a better cook by understanding all about oils and how to cook with this ingredient that is used in everyday cooking.


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Vinegars

Vinegars are the foundation of vinaigrettes, which are easy sauces to pour on anything (not just salads!).

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • If you’re just building your pantry, 2 to 3 varieties of vinegar is a great place to start. Apple cider, balsamic, red wine or sherry, and rice vinegar are ones we reach for frequently.

ideas for uses:

  • Vinegar + oil = the simplest vinaigrette
  • Vinegar + herbs + oil = herb sauce
  • Vinegar + sugar + hot water = pickling liquid

tips:

  • Learn how to make homemade vinaigrettes and herb sauces with these videos:
Video

How to Make a Vinaigrette

Vinaigrettes are a wonderful way to dress up not just salads, but proteins and vegetables too, and they're very easy to make.

Video

How to Make a Quick Herb Sauce

Learn how to make a quick and easy herb sauce to add flavor to any meal.


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Condiments

A few drops or spoonfuls of your favorite condiments can add flavor and body to any dish.

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • For sweetness – ketchup, jellies, jams, or preserves
  • For saltiness / umami – anchovy paste, bouillon, capers, fish sauce, soy sauce, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce
  • For spice / sharpness – chili sauces, harissa, horseradish, hot sauces, mustards, salsas
  • For body – creme fraiche, mayonnaise, sour cream, yogurt

diet specific:

  • Gluten-free – Sub Tamari for soy sauce (which contains wheat) and make sure the bouillon you buy is gluten-free.
  • Paleo – Look for ketchup, jellies, jams, or preserves that don’t contain high-fructose corn syrup and refined sugars. Avoid bouillon and sub aminos for soy sauce. Avoid creme fraiche, sour cream, and yogurt, but look for paleo mayonnaise made with just eggs and oil or try this avocado mayo.
  • Vegetarian – Avoid anchovy paste, and look for vegetarian bouillon and fish-free varieties of fish and Worcestershire sauce. You can also sub soy sauce in a recipe that calls for fish sauce.

IDEAS FOR USES:

  • Fish sauce / hot sauce / soy sauce (or Tamari or aminos) / tomato paste / harissa + stock = delicious soup base worth slurping
  • Mayo + garlic / balsamic vinegar / Sriracha = flavored “aioli”
  • Dijon / anchovy paste + vinegar + olive oil = sharper vinaigrette
  • Veggies + stock + creme fraiche / sour cream / yogurt = creamy soup

TIPS:

  • Just because a recipe doesn’t call for condiments doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use them to add flavor!
  • If you’re looking for a substitute for soy sauce with less sodium, try coconut aminos, made from the nectar of the coconut flower blossom and sea salt.
  • Mayo may not be the healthiest condiment, but there are healthy options around like paleo-friendly mayo made with healthy avocado oil.

Our friends at Thrive Market are giving you a chance to try a free bottle of coconut aminos here or a free jar of avocado mayo here (just pay $1.95 for shipping) when you sign up for a membership to Thrive*! You can cancel your membership within the 30 day trial period and you won’t be charged the annual fee of $59.95. If you become a member, you can shop from their great collection of products, which includes lots of gluten-free and paleo pantry essentials, all year long.


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Ethnic Bases

Ethnic bases and sauces can easily be turned into quick, flavorful dinners just by adding your choice of proteins and veggies.

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • Stock your favorite ethnic varieties – Indian curry bases, Italian pasta sauces, Japanese miso pastes or curry sauces, Latin enchilada sauces

diet specific:

  • Gluten-free – You can stock any of the bases above, but do check packaging to make sure they are gluten-free.
  • Paleo – You can stock any of the bases above, but do check packaging to make sure they are free of dairy, high-fructose corn syrup, and refined sugars.
  • Vegetarian – You can stock any of the bases above, but do check packaging to make sure they are free of animal products.

IDEAS FOR USES:

  • Thai curry paste + coconut milk + stock + veggies = rich veggie curry
  • Indian curry base + chicken + frozen veggies = better than Indian take-out
  • Enchilada sauce + black beans + tortillas + cheese = vegetarian enchiladas
  • Italian pasta sauce + pasta + veggies = easy pasta night

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Salts

Salt enhances the natural flavors of everything you’re cooking. It can also help draw out liquids in veggies for less-soggy cooking.

WHAT TO STOCK:

  • Use kosher or sea salt for everyday cooking.
  • Use table salt for baking because it’s super granular and dissolves well.
  • Keep an optional, nicer salt for “finishing” dishes, like a Maldon sea salt.

Tips:

  • Salt throughout cooking to give flavors time to build. (It’s one of our secrets to maximizing flavor!)
  • Sprinkle salt well above the dish to give it room to distribute.

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Sweeteners

Sweeteners are not just for baked goods. A little sweetness helps balance out savory meals and tart vinaigrettes. Our Flavor Star infographic below teaches more about balancing flavors.

what to stock:

  • Stock your preference of sugars, nectars, syrups, honeys, or no-cal alternatives.

diet specific:

  • Paleo – These depend more on personal opinion, but nectars, honeys, syrups, and stevia are typically paleo-approved sweeteners.
Infographic

Guide to Flavor Profiles

Create perfectly balanced and flavorful culinary masterpieces.


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Spices

Spices can add so much fragrance and flavor to meals in a simple, healthy way.

what to stock:

  • Start with no more than 6 to 8 spices and experiment with them until you’re ready to branch out more. Our 3 most commonly used spices are black pepper, coriander, cumin, and paprika. Yours may be different!
  • Pick 1 or 2 of your favorite ethnic flavors and buy their spice blends, like Chinese five spice, curry powder, garam masala (Indian), za’atar (Middle Eastern), or ras al hanout (Moroccan).

tips:

  • Add more flavor to a dish by adding spices even when a recipe doesn’t call for it – roasted veggies, soups, vinaigrettes, marinades . . . really anything!
  • Discover all the ways you can cook with spices with our Ultimate Spice Guide:
Infographic

Guide to Flavoring with Spices

Spice up your meals and add flavor to your meals with this handy spice chart.

Infographic

Popular Spice Blends

Blend spices together to create a whole new taste.


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Herbs

Dried and fresh herbs can add earthy aroma and another layer of flavor to any dish. Learn how to flavor your cooking with our Guide to Fresh Herbs infographic below.

what to stock:

  • 1 to 2 bunches of fresh herbs a week is enough to add a fresh finish to any dish.
  • Keep a variety of dried herbs around, since they last longer – basil, bay leaves, chives, cilantro, dill, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon, thyme

ideas for uses:

  • Vinegar + herbs + oil = herb sauce
  • Herbs + nuts + garlic + oil = easy pesto sauce

tips:

  • To store fresh herbs – like parsley, cilantro and mint – so that they last longer, “plant” them in a jar of water, cover with a plastic bag, seal with a rubber band, and store in the fridge, like how we do here:
Video

How to Store Herbs

Learn how to store herbs so that they'll stay fresher longer and last you for many recipes.

Infographic

Guide to Flavoring with Fresh Herbs

Add flavor and freshness to your cooking.


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Aromatics

So many meals start with a medley of aromatics, which can add depth and aroma. Learn how to use aromatics to add flavor and depth with our Guide to Aromatics below.

what to stock:

  • Anything in the allium family – garlic, shallots, and onions
  • Carrots and celery are also helpful aromatics to have on hand.

ideas for uses:

  • Onions + carrots + celery = start of many soups
  • Shallots + Dijon + vinegar + oil = tasty vinaigrette
  • Onions + sugar + oil = caramelized onions

tips:

  • Keep the scraps of your aromatics and use them to make broths and stock. These scraps can also be frozen, so that you can make homemade stock when you have time.
Infographic

Guide to Aromatics

Create delicious flavor foundations for a variety of meals.


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Citrus

Citrus brings out other flavors and adds a brightness to many dishes.

what to stock:

  • Keep at least 1 lemon and / or lime in your fridge every week. Add a squeeze at the end of cooking and notice the difference in flavor.

ideas for uses:

  • Lemon / orange + rosemary + chicken = roasted chicken
  • Lemon + herbs + oil = herb sauce
  • Lime + cilantro + butter = citrus-herb butter

tips:

  • Need to use up about-to-spoil citrus? Cut it in half and use it to clean your sink or disinfect a wooden cutting board. Or enjoy it in a glass of water or a cocktail!

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Cheese

Cheeses can be added to an assortment of dishes for vegetarian protein as well as ooey, gooey goodness.

what to stock:

  • Any of your favorites, but try to avoid pre-shredded cheese which often has unnatural fillers to keep the cheese from clumping and lasting longer.

diet specific:

  • Paleo – Since cheese is not paleo, stock cashews, which can be pulsed to form a cheese substitute.

ideas for uses:

  • Cheese + eggs = breakfast-for-dinner omelet
  • Cheese + tomato sauce + protein baked in the oven = bubbly, cheesy casserole
  • Cheese + bread + butter = grilled cheese

tips:

  • To prevent cheeses from spoiling, divide up into standard cooking / serving amounts and freeze. That way, you can always have a variety around without waste!

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Eggs

If you have eggs on hand, you can have a meal in under 5 minutes! They’re so versatile, you can create many different dishes with them, and they’re also a great source of protein.

ideas for uses:

  • Eggs + leftover veggies + cheese = frittata
  • Fried egg over pasta (or really anything) = fancy restaurant-quality dish
  • Eggs + flour + other baked goods = pancakes
  • Eggs + cauliflower rice = paleo tortillas

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Butter

Although butter should be used sparingly, they also add a richness to dishes that can make them feel special.

what to stock:

  • Butter and / or ghee (clarified butter)

diet specific:

  • Paleo – Make sure the butter and / or ghee is grassfed. Though not technically dairy, you may want to try other animal fats, such as beef, duck, and pork.

ideas for uses:

  • Butter + herbs = herbed butter

tips:

  • Butter freezes well, so if you know you won’t be using it all, freeze the sticks in the original wrapping and put in a freezer bag.
  • If you’ve never tried ghee, you’re in for a treat! Ghee is clarified butter, which means that all the milk solids have been removed, making it healthier and increasing the smoke-point.

Thanks to our friends at Thrive Market, you can now try a free jar of ghee (just pay $1.95 for shipping) when you sign up for a membership to Thrive here*! You can cancel your membership within the 30 day trial period and you won’t be charged the annual fee of $59.95. If you become a member, you can shop from their great collection of products, which includes lots of gluten-free and paleo pantry essentials, all year long.


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Other Dairy Products

These can be used to add body and depth to your dishes.

what to stock:

  • Items like milk, creme fraiche, sour cream, or yogurt.

diet specific:

  • Paleo – Since dairy is not paleo, use almond or coconut milks.

ideas for uses:

  • Creme fraiche / sour cream / yogurt + soup = creamier soup
  • Coconut milk + veggies + stock = fragrant pureed soup
  • Milk / yogurt + oatmeal + fruit + nuts = healthy breakfast
  • Fruit + yogurt (or coconut milk) = smoothie

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Frozen Proteins

Keeping a stock of frozen proteins means you always have something to cook after the simple act of defrosting.

what to stock:

  • Any of your favorites – chicken, pork, steak, lamb
  • Don’t forget about vegetarian proteins – edamame, tofu, and cooked legumes
  • Quicker defrosting proteins like bacon, shrimp, and fish are great for when you forget to defrost early. See how easily we defrost shrimp in the video below.

diet specific:

  • Vegetarian – Seitan and tempeh can also be frozen, so stock up on these in addition to edamame, tofu, and legumes.

ideas for uses:

  • Protein + grain + veggie = balanced meal
  • Protein + noodles + veggie + soup = noodle soup
  • Protein + grain + veggies + tortilla = easy wrap

tips:

  • Defrost packaged frozen protein in a bowl of lukewarm water.
  • For food safety, don’t refreeze unfrozen proteins. Get more tips on how to properly freeze and thaw foods with our Freezer Guide.
  • Our Guide to Frozen Food Storage & Shelf Life has all you need to know about how long frozen proteins (and other foods) will last:
Infographic

Guide to Frozen Food Storage

Everything you need to know about how to properly store food in your freezer.

Video

Prepping Frozen Shrimp

Watch how we defrost frozen shrimp when we need it for tonight's dinner.


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Frozen Veggies

Frozen produce allows you to enjoy your favorite fruits and veggies out of season, and in most cases, they’re just as good as fresh. Plus it can save prepping time and allows you to easily include veggies in every meal.

what to stock:

  • There are so many options – just choose your favorite! Broccoli, butternut squash, carrots, cauliflower, corn, green beans, mushrooms, peas, spinach, and sweet potatoes are all convenient to have on hand.
  • Fruits – berries, mangos, pineapple

diet specific:

  • Paleo – Avoid corn, which is not paleo.

ideas for uses:

  • Frozen veggies + egg + rice = fried rice
  • Frozen veggies + noodles + protein = noodle soup
  • Frozen veggies + oil + spices = roasted veggies
  • Frozen veggies + garlic + oil = sauteed veggies
  • Frozen fruit + coconut milk + lime juice = smoothie

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Frozen Starches

Most starches freeze easily, which means they never have to go bad and you can always have them at-the-ready.

what to stock:

  • Breads, uncooked fresh noodles, and tortillas all freeze very well, so stock up on your favorites.

diet specific:

  • Gluten-free – Check packaging to make sure breads, fresh noodles, and tortillas are gluten-free, but they all freeze just as well.
  • Paleo – Since most starches are not paleo friendly, freeze extra cauliflower rice for your easy starch.

ideas for uses:

  • Tortillas + cheese + veggies = quesadilla
  • Noodles + proteins + marinara sauce = easy pasta dinner
  • Breads + eggs + bacon + cheese = breakfast sandwich

tips:

  • Separate starches into serving amounts before freezing (i.e., for a family of 4, freeze bread in batches of 8 slices); otherwise they’ll all get stuck together and you’ll have to defrost everything at once.
  • To defrost, just leave out overnight.

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Frozen Meals

Having a few back-up meals – frozen leftovers or even healthier varieties of store-bought frozen or boxed meals – mean that even on nights that you’re too lazy to “cook,” you still have something in the bank.

what to stock:

  • Soups, casseroles, and meat and / or cheese based dishes freeze very well.
  • Our Top 10 Freezer-Friendly Meals is a good place to start when stocking up your freezer with back-ups:
Download

Top 10 Freezer-Friendly Meals

Keep your freezer stocked with Top 10 Freezer-Friendly Meals so you'll never stress about dinner.


*Note: This isn’t a sponsored post, but if you do end up signing up for an annual membership at Thrive Market, we’ll make a small affiliate commission. This helps us continue our mission of delivering lots of smart cooking info to you, all for free.

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